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September 3, 2017

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Déjà vu, Puerto Vallarta, Chamoy, and Marriage

June 26, 2017

 

​Déjà vu in the French language means “already seen”.  Coming to Puerto Vallarta’s “old town” did not just feel like I have seen” this landscape” before.  It was as if my reveries (some actively recurring in my mind still and many others from seemingly distant lifetimes ago) have come alive and manifested themselves.

 

 

The infinite view of the sun setting into the Pacific Ocean, the creamy white houses on the hillside, the clay tiled-rooves, the cobblestones, the municipal Seahorse (!!!), the quirky details on house doors, Church bells, stairwells, and eaves --- all seem to emerge into real form from the volumes of drawings and sketches in my mind and my notebooks.

 

In an article on Psychology Today, Dr. Judith Orloff clarifies:

 

“I’m often asked how to tell the difference between a feeling of déjà-vu when we first meet someone and an attraction stemming from an addictive obsession. Some addiction specialists say that whenever you meet someone and an explosion of fireworks go off, this is a sign not of true love, but of one neurosis meeting another. They suggest that you run as fast as you can in the opposite direction.”

Dr Orloff also adds:  “Mostly déjà-vu experiences are not obsessive or compulsive. They rather convey a quality that is quiet and solid…”  (Om.)

 

 

Oftentimes, I get too excited about déjà vu experiences.  Experiences of déjà vu seem to transport “me” to a different time-space.  It gives possibility to the non-linearity of time.  It brings me closer to the mystical and the spiritual realms, even for such short moments in an otherwise mundane life.

 

 

Such powerful “magical” experiences in our lives indeed stir us to make life changing choices e.g. marital contracts, friendships,